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Murine sperm capacitation, oocyte penetration and decondensation following moderate alcohol intake

Murine sperm capacitation, oocyte penetration and decondensation following moderate alcohol intake

Male chronic alcohol abuse causes testicular failure and infertility. We analyzed the effects of moderate sub-chronic alcohol intake on sperm morphology, capacitation, fertilization and sperm head decondensation. CF-1 male mice were administered 15% ethanol in drinking water for 15 days; control mice received ethanol-free water. Similar patterns of tyrosine phosphorylation were observed in capacitated spermatozoa of control and treated males. Percentage of hyperactivation (H) and spontaneous (SAR) and progesterone-induced (IAR) acrosome reaction significantly decreased at 120 and 150 min of capacitation in treated males compared to controls (H: 14.1 ± 2.5 vs 23.7 ± 2.6, P < 0.05; SAR-T120 min: 17.9 ± 2.5 vs 32.9 ± 4.1, P < 0.01; IAR-150 min: 43.3 ± 3.5 vs 73.1 ± 1.1, P < 0.001, n = 6). During in vitro fertilization (2.5, 3.5 and 4.5 h post-insemination), there was an increased percentage of fertilized oocytes (with a decondensed sperm head and one or two pronuclei) in treated males (P < 0.001, n = 7). After 60 min of in vitro decondensation with glutathione plus heparin, the percentage of decondensed sperm heads was significantly higher in treated males than in controls (mean ± s.d.: 57.1 ± 5.6 vs 48.3 ± 4.5, P < 0.05, n = 5). The percentage of morphologically normal sperm heads was significantly decreased in treated males with respect to controls (P < 0.001, n = 9). These results show that short-term moderate alcohol consumption in outbred mice affect sperm morphology, hyperactivation, acrosomal exocytosis, and the dynamics of in vitro fertilization and in vitro sperm nuclear decondensation.


Source: The journal of Reproductive Science

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