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Is there a common mechanism underlying air pollution exposures and reproductive outcomes noted in epidemiologic and in vitro fertilization lab-based studies?

Is there a common mechanism underlying air pollution exposures and reproductive outcomes noted in epidemiologic and in vitro fertilization lab-based studies?
Air pollution is considered the sixth largest threat to human health (1), and it has historically been studied in the context of natural experiments. In one of the earliest studied episodes, a confluence of weather conditions in 1952 led to a dense black smog across London. This fog, composed of emissions from coal and local factories, resulted in an excess of 3,000 deaths during the few weeks after its appearance. Subsequent studies in the United States found that air pollution was associated with increased risk of asthma-related hospitalizations, cardiovascular-related deaths, and inflammatory-mediated diseases.
Source: fertstert.org

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